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Conclusions and Directions From Evidence-Based Crime Prevention

  • Brandon C. Welsh
  • David P. Farrington

At the heart of the evidence-based paradigm is the notion that “we are all entitled to our own opinions, but not to our own facts” (Sherman, 1998:4). Many people may be of the opinion that hiring more police officers, for example, will yield a reduction in crime rates. However, an examination of the empirical research evidence on the subject reveals that this is not the case (Sherman and Eck, 2002; Weisburd and Eck, 2004).

Keywords

Crime Prevention Restorative Justice Street Lighting Boot Camp Crime Prevention Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brandon C. Welsh
    • 1
  • David P. Farrington
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Massachusetts Lowell870 Broadway StreetMA
  2. 2.University of CambridgeSidgwick AvenueCambridge

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