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Policing Crime Hot Spots

  • Anthony A. Braga

In recent years, crime scholars and practitioners have pointed to the potential benefits of focusing crime prevention efforts on crime places. A number of studies suggest that crime is not spread evenly across city landscapes. Rather, there is significant clustering of a crime in small places, or “hot spots,” that generate half of all criminal events (Pierce et al., 1988; Sherman et al., 1989a; Weisburd et al., 1992).

Keywords

Crime Prevention Crime Control Jersey City Directed Patrol Police Enforcement 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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  • Anthony A. Braga

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