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Formulation and Manufacturing

  • Leo Pavliv
  • James F. Cahill

The culmination of many years of research, development, animal testing, clinical studies, and mountains of paper or many gigabytes of memory eventually result in a patient taking a tablet, inhaling a powder, or taking some other formulation of a drug product to alleviate or cure a malady. This chapter focuses on the steps entailed to create the actual product, the formulation, which a patient takes for his or her malady, from initial concept through commercial sale.

Keywords

Drug Product Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Formulation Development Topical Product Penetration Enhancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leo Pavliv
    • 1
  • James F. Cahill
    • 2
  1. 1.Cumberland PharmaceuticalsTN
  2. 2.Biopharmaceutical SciencesCato Research Ltd.PA

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