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Women’s Health Research: Perspectives from the National Institutes of Health

  • Vivian W. Pinn
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 617)

During the past 15 years, much progress has been made in understanding women’s health. A notable recent comment about advancements in the science of women’s health was found in the March 22, 2006, women’s health theme issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). An editorial in that issue indicates that in the 5 years since JAMA’s previous theme issue on women’s health, interest, knowledge, and understanding about medical problems and issues related to women have increased importantly: “The keen interest in the topic of women’s health is evidenced by the 412 manuscripts, a record for JAMA, submitted for consideration in this issue.”

Keywords

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Human Papilloma Virus Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Interstitial Cystitis Menopausal Hormonal Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivian W. Pinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Research on Women’s HealthBethesdaUSA

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