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Watershed Management

  • Paul W. Adams
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 199)

Keywords

Watershed Management Timber Harvesting Forest Road Prescribe Fire Harvest System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul W. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest EngineeringOregon State UniversityCorvallis

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