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Retinal Photography and Angiography via Film and Digital Imaging Techniques

  • Thomas M. Clark

In ophthalmic photography little else is as true as the phrase, “One picture is worth a thousand words.” Ophthalmic photography has held a place of importance in ophthalmology since its beginning in 1886 when Jackman and Webster1 produced the first published human fundus photographs. These images were able to show a visible optic nerve, but little vessel detail due to a large central light reflex artifact from the cornea. Prior to this time clinicians would rely solely on notes and hand-drawn illustrations to depict the changing condition of their patients’ eyes. These visual notes and descriptions were very useful, but took time and were only as good as the artistic skills of the physician creating them.

Keywords

Retinal Pigment Epithelium Indocyanine Green Diabetic Macular Edema Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Cystoid Macular Edema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas M. Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology, Shiley Eye Center, Ophthalmic Photography and Electronic Imaging DepartmentUniversity of California, San DiegoSan Diego

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