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Cultural Analysis of Political Protest

  • Hank Johnston
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

The study of social movements and protest has straddled the divide between structure and culture since its inception: in part a reflection of how protest studies straddle the disciplines of sociology and political science. If one looks back almost 50 years, when the subfield was emerging, one finds a blending of structural concepts (such as structural strain and structural conduciveness), cultural factors (generalized beliefs and emergent norms), and ideational elements from social psychology (relative deprivation and rising expectations).

Keywords

Social Movement Collective Identity Social Movement Research Cultural Analysis Textual Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hank Johnston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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