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Effects of Hydrologic Management Decisions on Everglades Tree Islands

  • Kirsten Hofmockel
  • Curtis J. Richardson
  • Patrick N. Halpin
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 201)

Pressures from increasing agriculture and growing human populations have resulted in alteration of many aspects of the Everglades wetland mosaic in south Florida. Water management has focused on extracting services from the wetland system to support the influx of human inhabitants and growing agricultural production. Management practices to ensure water supplies for human use, control floods, and minimize hurricane effects have caused ecosystem fragmentation and substantial reduction of the spatial extent of the Everglades. Nearly half of the ecosystem’s original 404,686 ha have been transferred to agricultural use and urban development. To satisfy the needs of local inhabitants, a system of levees and canals has been installed over the past 50 years (Chap. 2). In addition, creation of the Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) impounded large sections of the wetland between Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades National Park.

Keywords

Landscape Pattern Patch Density Tree Island Everglades National Park South Florida Water Management District 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kirsten Hofmockel
    • 1
  • Curtis J. Richardson
    • 2
  • Patrick N. Halpin
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and EnvironmentAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth SciencesDuke University Wetland CenterDurhamUSA

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