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Transportation

  • David Hafemeister

Abstract

The romantic rides in Sandburg’s “eagle-car” have changed society. On the one hand, motor vehicle transportation is an integral thread of society’s fabric. On the other hand, excess mobility fractures old neighborhoods and families.

Keywords

Fuel Cell Fuel Economy Internal Combustion Engine Aerodynamic Drag Light Truck 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Hafemeister
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsCalifornia Polytechnic State UniversitySan Luis ObispoUSA

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