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Air Quality in Future Decades – Determining the Relative Impacts of Changes in Climate, Emissions, Global Atmospheric Composition, and Regional Land Use

  • C. Hogrefe
  • B. Lynn
  • B. Solecki
  • J. Cox
  • C. Small
  • K. Knowlton
  • J. Rosenthal
  • R. Goldberg
  • C. Rosenzweig
  • K. Civerolo
  • J.-Y. Ku
  • S. Gaffin
  • P. L. Kinney
Conference paper

In recent years, there has been a growing realization that regional-scale ozone (O3) air quality is influenced by processes occurring on global scales, such as the intercontinental transport of pollutants (Jacob et al., 1999; Fiore et al., 2002, 2003; Yienger et al., 2000) and the projected growth in global emissions that alter the chemical composition of the global troposphere (Prather and Ehhalt, 2001; Prather et al., 2003). However, little work has been performed to date to study the potential impacts of regional-scale climate change on near-surface air pollution. Climate change can influence the concentration and distribution of air pollutants through a variety of direct and indirect processes, including the modification of biogenic emissions, the change of chemical reaction rates, changes in mixedlayer heights that affect vertical mixing of pollutants, and modifications of synoptic flow patterns that govern pollutant transport. Another parameter affecting local and regional meteorology and air pollution is land use, and significant land use changes associated with continued urbanization are expected to occur over the same time scales as changes in regional climate.

Keywords

Anthropogenic Emission Biogenic Emission Sensitivity Simulation Future Decade York City Metropolitan Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Hogrefe
    • 1
  • B. Lynn
    • 2
  • B. Solecki
    • 3
  • J. Cox
    • 3
  • C. Small
    • 4
  • K. Knowlton
    • 4
  • J. Rosenthal
    • 4
  • R. Goldberg
    • 5
  • C. Rosenzweig
    • 5
  • K. Civerolo
    • 6
  • J.-Y. Ku
    • 6
  • S. Gaffin
    • 4
  • P. L. Kinney
    • 4
  1. 1.Atmospheric Science Research CenterNYSCDEC CentreAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies
  3. 3.Hunter College
  4. 4.Columbia University
  5. 5.NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies
  6. 6.New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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