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Infantile Esotropia

Abstract

An esotropia (ET) presenting during the first 6 months of life is termed infantile esotropia. There are various presentations of infantile esotropia with the following forms being the most common: small angle neonatal esotropia, congenital esotropia, Ciancia’ syndrome, and accommodative infantile esotropia. Normal newborn infants typically have a small exotropia (>70% of normal neonates) that usually resolves by 4 to 6 months of age. Infantile esotropia, on the other hand, is rare, and usually does not resolve spontaneously.

Keywords

Binocular Fusion Inferior Oblique Muscle Cycloplegic Refraction Dissociate Vertical Deviation Face Turn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science Business Media, LLC 2007

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