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Searching for Intelligence

  • Michael A. G. Michaud

Abstract

Searching our solar system through optical telescopes failed to provide persuasive evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence. To pursue the question further, searchers broadened the quest with new technologies and extended it outward to the stars. This expanded enormously the volume to be searched.

Keywords

Radio Signal Radio Telescope Radio Astronomy Advanced Civilization James Webb Space Telescope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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  • Michael A. G. Michaud

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