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Assumptions: After Contact

  • Michael A. G. Michaud

Abstract

Contact optimists have tended to assume that alien messages would be relatively easy to understand. The communication of quite complicated information is not very difficult, claimed Sagan, even for civilizations with very different biologies and social conventions. Once pictures are transmitted, it will be extremely simple to develop language—by show and tell.3

Keywords

Solar System Killer Whale Technological Civilization Advanced Society Advanced Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Michael A. G. Michaud

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