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Surveillance after Primary Therapy

  • Craig C. Earle

Abstract

Primary treatment for cancer is often a very regimented experience, with schedules and protocols. These provide comfort to patients because of their certainty. Constant contact with the medical staff helps patients feel that everything must be under control for now, and that if anything develops, someone will notice it. Yet as the end of treatment approaches, it is not uncommon for anxiety levels of patients to rise.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Rectal Cancer Clin Oncol National Comprehensive Cancer Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig C. Earle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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