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Abstract

Thousands of individual citations using the expression cancer advocacy can be found in contemporary medical and scientific literature as well as in the popular press and on Internet websites. For purposes of this chapter, the term cancer advocacy is used to describe a skill set that has been documented in previously published work by Clark and Stovall.1 This chapter also includes specific examples of how self-described advocacy organizations are involved with research organizations and how they influence cancer research and related health policy.

Keywords

Cancer Survivor Negotiation Skill National Coalition Practical Resource Cancer Advocacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ellen L. Stovall
    • 1
  1. 1.National Coalition for Cancer SurvivorshipSilver SpringUSA

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