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Internal Dose Assessment

Internal dose concepts are employed when radioactive material enters the body through any pathway, either in a workplace situation, in the nuclear medicine clinic (where the intakes are quite intentional), from eating or drinking contaminated food and water, and other such situations.

Keywords

Radioactive Material Absorb Dose Rate Internal Dose Cumulate Activity Dose Conversion Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Endnotes

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© Springer 2003

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