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Allergic Rhinitis

  • Melissa Pynnonen
  • Jeffrey Terrell

Abstract

A computerized PubMed search of MEDLINE 1966-March 2005 was performed. The subject headings “histamine H1 antagonists” and “steroids” were exploded and cross-referenced with “intranasal.” The resulting 63 articles were limited to “randomized controlled trial,” “human,” and “English language” resulting in 35 publications. The subject headings “histamine H1 antagonists” and “steroids” were exploded and limited to “humans,” “English language,” and “meta-analysis” resulting in two publications. These two searches were combined, resulting in 37 publications whose titles and abstracts were reviewed. Bibliographies were also reviewed to identify other relevant publications [1, 2]. These articles were then reviewed to identify those that met the following inclusion criteria: 1) patient population with seasonal allergic rhinitis confirmed by skin testing, 2) intervention with oral antihistamine versus intranasal corticosteroid spray, and 3) outcome measured in terms of relief of rhinitis symptoms or rhinitis quality of life improvement.

Keywords

Allergic Rhinitis Fluticasone Propionate Sodium Cromoglycate Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis Oral Antihistamine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa Pynnonen
    • 1
  • Jeffrey Terrell
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck SurgeryUniversity of Michigan Health SystemAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of OtolaryngologyUniversity of Michigan Medical CenterAnn ArborUSA

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