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The First Catalysts

  • Lawrie Lloyd
Chapter
Part of the Fundamental and Applied Catalysis book series (FACA)

Abstract

Efforts to develop processes using catalysts were vital to the growth of the chemical industry. For many years, the first catalysts were most probably the result of trial and error and were based on the observations of scientists. When Berzelius defined catalysis, the examples he quoted did not include any industrial applications. For example, no mention was made of the lead chamber process or the Phillips patent proposing the use of a platinum catalyst for sulfuric acid production.

Keywords

Sulfur Dioxide Hydrogen Sulfide Carbon Disulfide Iron Catalyst Contact Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrie Lloyd
    • 1
  1. 1.BathUK

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