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Simulations of Forecast and Climate Modes Using Non-Hydrostatic Regional Models

  • Masanori Yoshizaki
  • Chiashi Muroi
  • Hisaki Eito
  • Sachie Kanada
  • Yasutaka Wakazuki
  • Akihiro Hashimoto

Summary

Two applications with a cloud-resolving model are shown utilizing the Earth Simulator. The first application is a case in the winter cold-air outbreak situation observed over the Sea of Japan as a forecast mode. Detailed structures of the convergence zone (JPCZ) and formation of mechanism of transverse convective clouds (T-modes) are discussed. A wide domain in the horizontal (2000 × 2000) was used with a horizontal resolution of 1 km, and could reproduce detailed structures of the JPCZ as well as the cloud streets in the right positions. It is also found that the cloud streets of T-modes are parallel to the vertical wind shears and, thus, similar to the ordinary formation mechanism as longitudinal convective ones. The second application is changes in the Baiu frontal activity in the future warming climate from the present one as a climate mode. At the future warming climate, the Baiu front is more active over southern Japan, and the precipitation amounts increase there. On the other hand, the frequency of occurrence of heavy rainfall greater than 30 mm h-1 increases over the Japan Islands.

Keywords

Japan Meteorological Agency Vertical Wind Shear Mesoscale Convective System Climate Mode Cloud Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masanori Yoshizaki
  • Chiashi Muroi
  • Hisaki Eito
  • Sachie Kanada
  • Yasutaka Wakazuki
  • Akihiro Hashimoto

There are no affiliations available

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