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Prodrugs pp 1299-1304 | Cite as

Case Study: Mycophenolate Mofetil

  • William A. Marinaro
Part of the Biotechnology: Pharmaceutical Aspects book series (PHARMASP, volume V)

Abstract

Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an orally bioavailable prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), a potent immunosuppressive agent. MPA acts by inhibiting inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyzes the first step in de novo synthesis of guanine (Ransom, 1995). This process is critical to mitogen-stimulating lymphocytes, which gives rise to MPA’s therapeutic efficacy.

Keywords

Mycophenolate Mofetil Mycophenolic Acid Glucuronide Conjugate Amino Ester Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Marinaro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical ChemistryThe University of KansasLawrenceUSA

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