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Prodrugs pp 417-428 | Cite as

Controlled Release - Proenzymes

  • Richard L. Schowen
Part of the Biotechnology: Pharmaceutical Aspects book series (PHARMASP, volume V)

Abstract

Prodrugs are familiar entities to readers of this volume, while proenzymes are a group of naturally occurring proteins that are of increasingly recognized biological significance (Saklatvala et al., 2003). There is a structural resemblance between prodrugs and proenzymes, as Figure 1 illustrates. Both consist of two linked structural units. One of these units will eventually become the active drug in the case of prodrugs, or the active (mature) enzyme in the case of proenzymes. The other unit changes the properties of its partner unit while the two units remain linked.

Keywords

Cysteine Protease Aspartyl Protease Mature Enzyme Tetrahedral Intermediate Proenzyme Activation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Schowen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical ChemistryUniversity of KansasLawrence

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