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The most famous dog in history

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

June 1957. Flying more than 70,000 feet above Soviet Kazakhstan, an altitude which exceeded the reach of any Soviet interceptor aircraft, an alert pilot of an American Lockheed U-2 spy plane spotted something interesting in the distance and departed from his prescribed course to get some photographs. What he found would astound his intelligence chiefs in Washington. He had inadvertently stumbled upon the Baikonur launch facility. This was the “crown jewel of Soviet space technology, whose existence had not even been suspected”, according to the memoirs of Richard M. Bissell Jr., director of the American U-2 spy plane programme and of photo-reconnaissance at the Central Intelligence Agency [1].

Keywords

York Time Telemetry System Central Intelligence Agency Launch Site Space Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2007

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