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Phobos, crisis and decline

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

VEGA 2 was the last Soviet or Russian Venus mission and remains so to the present day. In the 1980s, the Soviet Union and then Russia turned their attention back to Mars. By 1986, Soviet scientists were beginning to reach the limits of what could be achieved on Venus, although some further missions were sketched (Chapter 8). With the unbroken success of the Venus programme from 1975 to 1986, they had good reason to expect that their new efforts on Mars would be more successful than some of the previous missions.

Keywords

Mars Global Surveyor Martian Surface Mars Express Mars Orbit Lunar Rover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2007

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