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OKB Lavochkin

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

Zond 2 marked the end of the involvement of Korolev’s design bureau in the Soviet planetary programme. Korolev’s design bureau, OKB-1, had almost single-handedly begun and run the main programmes within the Soviet space endeavour. In August 1964, the Soviet Communist Party and government had resolved to compete head to head with the Apollo programme to send a man to the moon. From there on, Korolev’s efforts were ever more focused on the man-on-the-moon programme, adapting the N-l rocket for lunar use and flying the Soyuz spacecraft. These were huge undertakings. The decision was taken by Korolev and the government in spring the following year to spin off several key aspects of OKB-1 to other design offices. Communications satellites (e.g., Molniya) were made the responsibility of the NPO-PM design bureau in Krasnoyarsk, for example. Here, all the interplanetary probes, along with the troublesome block L, were given over to OKB Lavochkin.

Keywords

Solar Wind Communication Session Design Bureau Chief Designer Parking Orbit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2007

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