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Ethics and Ethnocentricity in Interpretation and Critique

Challenges to the Anthropology of Corporeality and Death
  • ARTHUR A. DEMAREST
Part of the INTERDISCIPLINARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO ARCHAEOLOGY book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The other chapters in this book show an extraordinary level of scholarship, as well as sensitivity, dealing with the topic of how indigenous cultures of the Americas have treated the dead human body and its parts in rituals and in warfare.

Keywords

Indigenous People American Anthropological Association Mortuary Practice Maya Civilization Indigenous Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • ARTHUR A. DEMAREST

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