Advertisement

Advanced Vehicle Vertical Motion Control

Abstract

Apart from vehicle lateral and longitudinal dynamics, vehicle vertical dynamics also received continuous research efforts during the last four decades. Generally, vehicle suspension control, vehicle rollover avoidance and road slope estimation are three main research directions in this field

Keywords

Suspension System Ride Comfort Active Suspension Vehicle Suspension Road Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. K. Jurgen, “Global’ 90 cars: electronics-aided,” IEEE Spectrum, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 45–49, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. Appleyard and P. E. Wellstead, “Active suspensions: some background,” IEE Proceedings-Control Theory and Applications, vol. 142, no. 2, pp. 123–127, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    K. Bogsjo and A. Forsen, “Fatigue relevant road surgface statistics,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 724–733, 2004.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. Hrovat, Optimal Passive Vehicle Suspensions, Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Davis, CA, 1979.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. Hrovat, D. L. Margolis, and M. Hubbard, “Suboptimal semi-active vehicle suspensions,” Proceedings of Journalism Association of Community Colleges, 1980.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    D. Hrovat and M. Hubbard, “Optimal vehicle suspension minimizing RMS rattle-space, sprung-mass acceleration and jerk,” ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 228–236, 1981.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    D. Hrovat, “Survey of advanced suspension developments and related optimal control applications,” Automatica, vol. 33, no. 10, pp. 1781–1817, 1997.zbMATHCrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. Karnopp, “Design principles for vibration control systems using semi-active dampers,” ASME Journal of Dynamics Systems, Measurements and Control, vol. 112, pp. 448–455, 1990.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. P. La Barre, R, T. Forbes, and S. Andrews, “The measurement and analysis of road surface roughness,” Motor Industry Research Association Report 1970/5, 1970.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    B. Sevin and W. D. Pilkey, “Optimum shock and vibration isolation,” The Shock and Vibration Information Center, United States Department of Defense, 1971.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Proposals for generalized road inputs to vehicles, ISO/DIS2631, 1972, pp. 1–7.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    J. D. Robson, “Road surface description and vehicle response,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 25–35, 1979.MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    M. W. Sayers, “Dynamic terrain inputs to predict structural integrity of ground vehicles,” University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute Report UMTRI-88-16, 1988.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    M. W. Sayers, “Profiles of roughness,” Transportation Research Record 1260, pp. 106–111, 1990.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    V. Rouillard, “Using predicted ride quality to characterise pavement roughness,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 36, no. 2/3, pp. 116–131, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    K. Ahlin, J. Granlund, and F. Lindstrom, “Comparing road profiles with vehicle perceived roughness,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 36, no. 2/3, pp. 270–286, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    J. Lu and M. DePoyster, “Multiobjective optimal suspension control to achieve integrated ride and handling performance,” IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 807–821, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    R. Caponetto, O. Diamante, and G. Fargione, et. al, “A soft computing approach to fuzzy sky-hook control of semi-active suspension,” IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 786–798, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    I. Hostens and H. Ramon, “Descriptive analysis of combine cabin vibrations and their effect on the human body,” Journal of Sound and Vibration, vol. 266, no. 3, pp. 453–464, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    S. Park, A. A. Popov and D. J. Cole, “Vehicle suspension optimisation for heavy vehicles on deformable ground,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 3–12, 2004.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    D. Rubinstein and R. Hitron, “A detailed multi-body model for dynamic simulation of off-road tracked vehicles,” Journal of Terramechanics, vol. 41,no. 2–3, pp. 163–173, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    S. Park, A. A. Popov and D. J. Cole, “Influence of soil deformation on off-road heavy vehicle suspension vibration,” Journal of Terramechanics, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 41–68, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    V. DeBrunner, D. Zhou, and M. Ta, “Adaptive vibration control of a bridge and heavy truck,” Proceedings of IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, pp. 389–393, 2003.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    M. Valask, J. Kejval, and J. Maca, et. al, “Bridge-friendly truck suspension,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 13–22, 2004.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    M. C. Smith and G. W. Walker, “Performance limitations and constraints for active and passive suspensions: a mechanical multi-port approach,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 137–168, 2000CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    E. Esmailzadeh and H. D. Taghirad, “Active vehicle suspensions with optimal state-feedback control,” International Journal of Modeling and Simulation, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 228–238, 1998.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Y.-P. Kuo and T.-S. Li, “GA-based fuzzy PI/PD controller for automotive active suspension system,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, vol. 46, no. 6, pp. 1051–1056, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    E. K. Bender, “Optimum linear preview control with application to vehicle suspension,” Journal of Basic Engineering Series D90, pp. 213–221, 1968.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    H.-S Roh and Y. Park, “Stochastic optimal preview control of an active vehicle suspension,” Journal of Sound and Vibration, vol. 220, no. 2, pp. 313–330, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    G. N. Fouskitakis and S. D. Fassois, “Long-memory modeling and prediction of automotive active suspension power consumption,” Proceedings of the American Control Conference, pp. 3354–3358, 1997.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    J. Campos, L. Davis, and F. L. Lewis, et. al, “Active suspension control of ground vehicle heave and pitch motions,” Proceedings of IEEE Mediterranean Control Conference on Control and Automation, pp. 222–233, 1999.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    S. Ikenaga, F. L. Lewis, and J. Campos, et. al, “Active suspension control of ground vehicle based on a full-vehicle model,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, pp. 4019–4024, 2000.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    C. Yue, T. Butsuen, and J. K. Hedrick, “Alternative control laws for automotive active suspensions,” ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, vol. 111, pp. 286–291, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    P. Michelberger, J. Bokor, and L. Palkovics, “Robust design of active suspension system,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 14, pp. 145–165, 1994.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    L. Palkovics, P. Caspar, and J. Bokor, “Design of active suspension system in the presence of physical parameter uncertainties,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 1, pp. 696–700, 1993.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    B. B. Jager, “Multiobjective control: an overview,” Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, pp. 440–445, 1997.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    P. Gaspar, I. Szaszi, and J. Bokor, “Mixed H 2/H control design for active suspension structures,” Perodicapolytechnica Series of Transportation Engineering, vol. 28, no. 1–2, pp. 3–16, 2000.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    S.-B. Choi, H.-S. Lee and Y.-P. Park, “H control performance of a full-vehicle suspension featuring magnetorheological dampers,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 341–360, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    L. Zuo and S. A. Nayfeh, “Structured H 2 optimization of vehicle suspensions based on multi-wheel models,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 351–371,2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    D. Sammier, O. Sename and L. Dugard, “Skyhook an H control of semi-active suspensions: some practical aspects,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 39, no. 4, pp 279–308, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    X. Shen and H. Peng, “Analysis of active suspension systems with hydraulic actuators,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 143–152,2004.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    S.-H. Chen and J.-H. Chou, “Stability robustness of optimal active uncertain suspensions incorporating human sensitivity to vibration,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 303–319, 2004.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    P. Caspar, I. Szaszi, and J. Bokor, “Design of robust controllers for active vehicle suspension using the mixed μ synthesis,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 193–228, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    A. S. Cherry and R. P. Jones, “A fuzzy rule based approach to non-linear control of an automotive suspension system,” Proceedings of IEE Colloquium on Active Suspension Technology for Automotive and Railway Applications, vol. 4, pp. 5/1–5/3, 1992.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    T. Hashiyama, T. Furuhashi, and Y. Uchikawa, “Design of fuzzy controllers for semi-active suspension generated through the genetic algorithm,” Proceedings of New Zealand International Two-Stream Conference on Artificial Neural Networks and Expert Systems, pp. 166–169, 1995.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    N. Al-Holou, J. Weaver, and T. Lahdhiri, et. al, “Sliding mode-based fuzzy logic controller for a vehicle suspension system,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 6, pp. 4188–4192, 1999.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Y.-P. Kuo and S. Li, “A composite EP-based fuzzy controller for active suspension system,” International Journal of Fuzzy Systems, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 183–191,2000.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    S. G. Foda, “Neuro-fuzzy control of a semi-active car suspension system,” Proceedings of IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and signal Processing, vol. 2, pp. 686–689, 2001.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    K. Hyniova, A. Stribrsky, and J. Honcu, “Fuzzy control of mechanical vibrating systems,” Proceedings of International Carpathian Control Conference, pp. 393–398, 2001.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    X. Peng, P. Vadakkepat, and T. H. Lee, “DNA coded GA for the rule base optimization of a fuzzy logic controller,” Proceedings of Congress on Evolutionary Computation, vol. 2, pp. 1191–1196, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    W. Rattasiri and S. K. Halgamuge, “Computationally advantageous and stable hierarchical fuzzy systems for active suspension,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 48–61, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    S.-J. Huang and W.-C. Lin, “Adaptive fuzzy controller with sliding surface for vehicle suspension control,” IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 550–559, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. 53.
    S. Y. Moon and W. H. Kwon, “Genetic-based fuzzy control for automotive active suspensions,” Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems, vol. 2, pp. 923–929, 1996.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    A. G. Thompson, “An optimal suspension for an automobile on a random road,” SAE#790478, 1979.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    M. M. Oblak, A. S. Lesnika, and B. J. Butinar, “Optimum design of stochastically excited non-linear dynamic systems without geometric constraints,” International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, vol. 53, no. 11, pp. 2429–2443, 2002.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Y. Zhang and A. G. Alleyne, “A new approach to half-car active suspension control,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 5, pp. 3762–3767,2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. 57.
    J. Marzbanrad, G. Ahmadi, and H. Zohoor, “Stochastic optimal preview control of a vehicle suspension,” Journal of Sound and Vibration, vol. 275, pp. 973–990, 2004.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    A. Patel and J. F. Dunne, “NARX neural network modelling of hydraulic suspension dampers for steady-state and variable temperature operation,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 285–328, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    W. Kozukue and H. Miyaji, “Control of vehicle suspension using neural network,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 153–161, 2004.Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    J.-S. Lin and C.-J. Huang, “Nonlinear backstepping control design of half-car active suspension systems,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 32, no. 3/4, pp. 332–350, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    M. Gobbi, F. Levi, and G. Mastinu, “Multi-objective robust design of the suspension system of road vehicles,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 537–546, 2004.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    H. Tokunaga, K. Misaji, and Y. Shimuzu, “On-Center steer feel evaluation based on non-linear vibration analytical method,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 391–400, 2004.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    H.-S. Tan and T. Bradshaw, “Model identification of an automotive hydraulic active suspension system,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 5, pp. 2920–2924, 1997.Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    R. Majjad, “Estimation of suspension parameters,” Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Control Applications, pp. 522–527, 1997.Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    O. Nelles and R. Isermann, “Basis function networks for interpolation of local linear models,” Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, vol. 1, pp. 470–475, 1996.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    M. Bomer, M. Zele, and R. Isermann, “Comparison of different fault detection algorithms for active body control components: automotive suspension system,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 1, pp. 476–481,2001.Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    M. Borner, H. Straky, and T. Weispfenning, et. al, “Model based fault detection of vehicle suspension and hydraulic brake systems,” Mechatronics, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 999–1010, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    D. Fischer, E. Kaus, and R. Isermann, “Model based sensor fault detection for an active vehicle suspension,” Proceedings of IFAC Symposium on Fault Detection, Supervision and Safety of Technical Processes, 2002.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    D. Fischer, E. Kaus, and R. Isermann, “Fault detection for an active vehicle suspension,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, pp. 4377–4382,2003.Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    W.-H. Ma and H. Peng, “Worst-case manoeuvres for the roll-over and jackknife of articulated vehicles,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 4, pp. 2263–2267, 1998.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    B.-C. Chen and H. Peng, “A real-time rollover threat index for sports utility vehicles,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 2, pp. 1233–1237, 1999.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    I. Cech, “Anti-roll and active roll suspensions,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 91–106, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. 73.
    V. Diaz, M. G. Fernandez, and J. L. S. Roman, et. al, “A new methology for predicting the rollover limit of buses,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 340–353, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    A. Hac, T. Brown and J. Martens, “Detection of vehicle rollover,” SAE#2004-01-1757, 2004.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    J. Ackermann and D. Odenthal, “Damping of vehicle roll dynamics by gain scheduled active steering,” Proceedings of European Control Conference, 1999.Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    D. Odenthal, T. Bunte, and J. Ackermann, “Nonlinear steering and braking control for vehicle rollover avoidance,” Proceedings of European Control Conference, 1999.Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    S. Takano and M. Nagai, “Dynamics control of large vehicles for rollover prevention,” Proceedings of IEEE International Vehicle Electronics Conference, pp. 85–89, 2001.Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    T. Acarman and U. Ozguner, “Rollover prevention for heavy trucks using frequency shaped sliding mode control,” Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Control Applications, vol. 1, pp. 7–12, 2003.Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    D. J. M. Sampson and D. Cebon, “Active roll control of single unit heavy road vehicles,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 229–270, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    S. Takano, M. Suzuki, and M. Nagai, et. al, “Analysis of large vehicle dynamics for improving roll stability,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 73–82, 2004.Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    B. P. Jeppesen and D. Cebon, “Real-time fault identification in an active roll control system,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 37, pp. 360–372, 2003.Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    B. P. Jeppesen and D. Cebon, “Analytical redundancy techniques for fault detection in an active heavy vehicle suspension,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 42, no. 1/2, p75–88, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. 83.
    A. Alleyne, “Improved vehicle performance using combined suspension and braking forces,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol. 3, pp. 1672–1676, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    S. Rakheja, K. Wang, and R. Bhat, et. al, “Enhancement of ride vibration environment of tracked sidewalk snowploughs: vehicle modelling and analysis,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 193–222,2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 85.
    P.-E. Boileau, S. Rakheja, and Z. Wang, “Ride vibration environment of tracked sidewalk snowploughs: spectral classification,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 309–326, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    S. Zetterstrom, “Electromechanical steering, suspension, drive and brake modules,” Proceedings of IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, vol. 3, pp. 1856–1863,2002.Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    A. Trachtler, “Integrated vehicle dynamics control using active brake, steering and suspension systems,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 1–12,2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    P. Lingman and B. Schmidtbauer, “Road slope and vehicle mass estimation using Kalman filtering,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol.37, pp 12–23,2002.Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    J. Ryu and J. C. Gerdes, “Estimation of vehicle roll and road bank angle,” Proceedings of American Control Conference, vol.3, pp. 2110–2115,2004.Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    X. Liu and J. Wagner, “Design of a vibration isolation actuator for automotive seating systems-Part I: modelling and passive isolator performance,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 335–356,2002CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    X. Liu, J. Wagner, “Design of a vibration isolation actuator for automotive seating systems-Part II: controller design and actuator performance,” International Journal of Vehicle Design, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 357–375,2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    B.-C. Chen, “Human-in-the-loop optimization of vehicle dynamics control with rollover prevention,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 252–261,2004.Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    W. Choromanski and J. Kisilowski, “Human-vehicle system modelling-focus on heuristic modelling of driver-operator reactions and mechatronic suspension,” Vehicle System Dynamics, Supplement, vol. 41, pp. 262–271,2004.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Personalised recommendations