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Abstract

Over the last two decades, research and development of intelligent vehicles (IV) have experienced tremendous growth and enjoyed numerous successful applications in land, sea, and air, for scientific, civilian, or military missions. Interests in intelligent vehicles are motivated mainly by their great potentials for significant enhancements of driving safety and efficiency, and eventually notable improvements in the quality of life in modern societies. As a major component of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), intelligent vehicles utilize sensing, communication, computing and control technologies to understand driving states and environments for the purpose of assisting vehicular operations, traffic control, service management, and many other activities. Furthermore, current progresses in several exciting and emerging techniques, especially pervasive computing, ad hoc networks, and intelligent spaces, will offer new thrusts to future development in this field. We are confident that smart vehicles driving on smart roads, or even driving in intelligent spaces, would be the “next wave” for research and development in intelligent vehicles

Keywords

Global Position System IEEE Transaction Global Position System Intelligent Transportation System Autonomous Vehicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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