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Contributions of the Sociology of Mental Health for Understanding the Social Antecedents, Social Regulation, and Social Distribution of Emotion

  • Robin W. Simon

Keywords

Mental Health Emotional Distress American Sociological Review Emotional Socialization Expressive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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  • Robin W. Simon

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