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Transition to Adulthood, Mental Health, and Inequality

  • Susan Gore
  • Robert H. AseltineJr
  • Elizabeth A. Schilling

Keywords

Mental Health Young Adult Young People Mental Health Problem Antisocial Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Gore
  • Robert H. AseltineJr
  • Elizabeth A. Schilling

There are no affiliations available

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