Advertisement

Operating and window systems will never strike back or Independence day for Java developers

  • N. Fricke
  • C. Lilienthal
  • M. Lippert
  • S. Roock
  • H. Wolf
Chapter
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT)

Abstract

With the use of Java and the JDK*, independence from specific platforms (operating systems and window systems) becomes possible. For the development of commercial applications however, Java and the JDK are not enough, and tools such as a GUI-builder are needed. When employing a GUI-builder, new dependencies on the builder-generated code have to be considered. Independence is an important prerequisite for enabling portability and reusability. There are many GUI-builders on the market and it is impossible to say which will end up being successful. However, integration of existing programs designed with different GUI-builders is an ongoing problem. We have designed and implemented a Java framework, which uses a GUI-builder independent format to store GUI resources. This framework can be combined with any GUI-builder that supports JavaBeans.

Keywords

Java GUI-builder Portability Independence frameworks 

References

  1. Bäumer, D., Gryczan, G., Knoll, R., Lilienthal, C., Riehle, D. and Züllighoven, H. (1997). Framework Development for Large Systems. Communications of the ACM, 40, 10, pp. 52–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fricke, N., Lippert, M., Roock, S. and Wolf, H. (1997). Java Framework. University of Hamburg, Department of Computer Science, Software Engineering Group. URL: http://swt-www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/—Software/JWAMV1.0/ (in German).Google Scholar
  3. Gosling, J., Joy, B. and Steele, G. (1997). The Java language specification Addison-Wesley. URL: http://java.sun.com/products/jdk/1.1/download-pdf-ps.html.Google Scholar
  4. Javasoft (1996a). JavaBeans 1.01 API Specification. SUN Microsystems. URL: http://java.sun.com/beans/spec.html.
  5. Javasoft (1996b). Java Object Serialization Specification. SUN Microsystems.Google Scholar
  6. Javasoft (1996c). Java-WorkShop. SUN Microsystems. URL: http://www.sun.com/workshop/java/.
  7. Javasoft (1997). BeanBox. SUN Microsystems. URL: http://java.sun.com/beans/beanbox.html.
  8. Microsoft (1996). Visual J++. URL: http://www.microsoft.com/visualj/.
  9. Nulden, U. (1997). The Why, What, and How of Reuse in Software Development. In K. Braa, E. Monteiro (eds.), Proceedings of Iris’20: Social Informatics.Google Scholar
  10. ObjectShare (1997). Parts for Java. http://www.objectshare.com/p4j/p4j2info.htm.
  11. Riehle, D. and Züllighoven, H. (1995). A Pattern Language for Tool Construction and Integration Based on the Tools & Material Metaphor. In J.O. Coplien, D.C. Schmidt, Pattern Languages of Program Design. Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  12. Strunk, W. and Fröse, F. (1996). Using Design Patterns to Restructure the User Interface Part of an Application Framework. Theory and Practice of Object Systems 2, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Valaer, L.A. and Babb, R.G. II (1997). Choosing a User Interface Development Tool. IEEE Software. 14, 4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© IFIP 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Fricke
    • 1
  • C. Lilienthal
    • 1
  • M. Lippert
    • 1
  • S. Roock
    • 1
  • H. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceSoftware Engineering Group University of HamburgGermany

Personalised recommendations