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Trends in teaching informatics

  • A. Joe Turner
Chapter
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT)

Abstract

Most of the development of informatics curricula has focused almost exclusively on the technical content of the courses in a curriculum. More recently there has been increasing attention paid to pedagogical and nontechnical subject course material. This paper surveys some of the trends in informatics education relative to pedagogical and nontechnical aspects. Some observations are made on current trends and the importance of these aspects relative to more traditional curricular concerns.

Keywords

Informatics university education informatics majors curriculum (general) academic requirements business and industry requirements.5 

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Copyright information

© IFIP 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Joe Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceClemson UniversityClemsonUSA

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