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Introduction to computing: a course in computer science fundamentals

  • Russell L. Shackelford
  • Richard J. LeblancJr.
Chapter
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT)

Abstract

The traditional approach to introducing students to computer science has been through a course built around the development of programming skills, ignoring the practical reality of increasing powerful application-oriented software packages. In this paper we describe a two course sequence which has been taught to majors in computer science and a variety of other disciplines for the last four years. We emphasize effective use of abstraction and the acquisition of software development skills which are language independent. Our experience with these courses has convinced us that it is possible to introduce the conceptual foundations of computer science to beginning students in a way which both engages them and gives them a basis for learning advanced ways to solve problems using computing.

Keywords

Informatics university education curriculum (start) 

References

  1. Canup, M. and Shackelford, R. (1998) Using Software to Solve Problems in Large Computing Classes, submitted to the Twenty-ninth SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, Atlanta, February 1998.Google Scholar
  2. Harel, D. and Rosner, R. (1992) Algorithmics: The Spirit of Computing, 2nd edition. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  3. LeBlanc, R. and Shackelford, R. (1998) Why Pseudocode Should Be Your Students’ First Programming Language, submitted to the Twenty-ninth SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, Atlanta, February 1998.Google Scholar
  4. Schaffer, K. (1998) Doing Something Real: Teaching as Part of the Undergraduate Experience, submitted to the Twenty-ninth SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, Atlanta, February 1998.Google Scholar
  5. Shackelford, R. (1997) Introduction to Computing and Algorithms. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  6. Toothman, B. and Shackelford, R. (1998) The Effects of Partially-Individualized Assignments on Subsequent Student Performance, submitted to the Twenty-ninth SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, Atlanta, February 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© IFIP 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell L. Shackelford
    • 1
  • Richard J. LeblancJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology AtlantaUSA
  2. 2.College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology AtlantaUSA

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