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Anti-Predator Strategies of Cathemeral Primates: Dealing with Predators of the Day and the Night

  • Ian C. Colquhoun
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Abstract

The entire evolutionary history of the order Primates has occurred in ecological contexts where all primates, like all other animals (Vermeij, 1987; Endler, 1991, p. 176), are, at least, at risk of predation at some point in their lives (Hart & Sussman, 2005). These predator-prey ecological relationships can be conceived of as interspecific, asymmetric “attack-defense” arms races that give rise to diffuse coevolutionary effects (Dawkins & Krebs, 1979; Janzen, 1980). Predators and their prey exhibit asymmetric interactions because the selective pressure of predators on prey species is stronger than the selective pressure of prey species on their predators. The asymmetric nature of these relationships has been termed the “life-dinner principle” (Dawkins & Krebs, 1979): Failure on a predator’s part means it has lost a meal, but failure on the prey’s part dramatically increases its likelihood of being the meal (e.g., Terborgh, 1983; Vermeij, 1987; Lima & Dill, 1990; Endler, 1991, p. 176; Stanford, 2002).

Keywords

Alarm Call Howler Monkey Lemur Catta Loud Call Brown Lemur 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian C. Colquhoun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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