Advertisement

Security and Confidentiality on Laboratory Computer Systems

  • Daniel F. Cowan
Chapter
  • 1.3k Downloads
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

The issue of computer system security has changed somewhat over the years, as technology has evolved from reliance on inaccessible, large, centralized mainframes to the use of distributed, linked or networked systems. Modern computer technology based on microcomputers and on-line access and broader use of powerful and user-friendly programs has put computer applications and other data-processing functions previously done only by computer operations experts into the hands of users. This improvement in efficiency and effectiveness presents, however, a serious challenge to achieving adequate data security. Progress in distribution of computer technology has not been accompanied by an increase in the knowledge of users about the vulnerability of data and information to such threats as unauthorized deliberate or accidental modification, disclosure, and destruction. Perhaps the greatest challenge is for all users to be aware of the possible ways that the integrity of a computer system can be compromised and to understand that full and confident use depends on the integrity of the system.

Keywords

Smart Card Security Level Laboratory Computer Trojan Horse Protected Health Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Barrows, RC Jr, Clayton PD. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records. J Am Med Inform Assoc 1996; 3:139–148PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Behlen, FM, Johnson, SB. Multicenter patient records research: Security policies and tools. J Am Med Inform Assoc 1999; 6:435–443PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Joint Healthcare Information Alliance (JHITA) URL:http://www.jhita.org/hipprs.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    CIO, 2000 CIO Magazine, January; wysiwyg://content/7/http//wwwcio…l/ procedures_sidebarl_content.htmlGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    HCFA Internet Security Policy, November 24, 1998. Health Care Financing Agency (HCFA), Baltimore, MarylandGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel F. Cowan

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations