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Why Study the Genomes of Fungi?

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Abstract

Fungi are eukaryotes, just like animals and plants. Although they have the same basic genetic structures as do animals and plants, there are some differences arising from the fungal lifestyle that need special explanation, which is one reason why they merit special study. There are other reasons that make fungi worthy of investigation in their own right, however, which we will explain in what follows. In summary, these reasons are: (1) the part played by fungi in nature make them crucially important to the maintenance of life on Earth; (2) they are enormously useful to us in industry right now, and they have an enormous potential for us to exploit in the future; and (3) as probably the oldest evolutionary line of eukaryotes, they provide us with easily studied model organisms.

Keywords

Fruit Body Ergot Alkaloid Killer Whale Fungal Product Diploid Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Publications and Websites Worth a Visit

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Historical Publications Worth Knowing About

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2002

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