Advertisement

Arthroscopic Treatment of the Arthritic Shoulder

  • Gregory S. Bauer
  • Theodore A. Blaine
  • Louis U. Bigliani

Abstract

The value of shoulder arthroscopy in the treatment of glenohumeral arthritis has not been clearly defined. Ogilvie-Harris and Wiley reported the results of arthroscopic debridement for osteoarthritis in 54 patients in 1986.1 At 3 years follow-up, successful results were achieved in two-thirds of patients with mild disease, and in one-third of patients with severe degenerative disease. Somewhat earlier, Cofield had described the use of arthroscopy in eight men with glenohumeral arthritis.2 Although all patients were thought to have benefited from the procedure, four of the patients were scheduled for additional reconstructive procedures based on the arthroscopic findings. These mixed early results, combined with the success of shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of arthritis, probably explain the paucity of reports on arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral arthritis.

Keywords

Rotator Cuff Shoulder Arthroplasty Glenohumeral Joint Loose Body Arthroscopic Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ogilvie-Harris DJ, Wiley AM. Arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder. A general appraisal. J Bone Joint Surg Br 1986 68:201–207.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cofield RH. Arthroscopy of the shoulder. Mayo Clin Proc 1983; 58: 501–508.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ratcliffe A, Flatow EL, Roth N, Saed-Nejad F, Bigliani LU. Biochemical markers in synovial fluid identify early osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. Clin Orthop 1996: 45–53.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Weinstein DM, Bucchieri JS, Pollock RG, Flatow EL, Bigliani LU. Arthroscopic debridement of the shoulder for osteoarthritis. Arthroscopy 2000 16:471–476.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Outerbridge RE. The etiology of chondromalacia patallae. J Bone Joint Surg Br 1961 43:752–757.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Harryman DT II, Matsen FA III, Sidles JA. Arthroscopic management of refractory shoulder stiffness. Arthroscopy 1997 13:133–147.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Neer CS H. Replacement arthroplasty for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1974; 56: 1–13.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Naranja RJ, Jr, Iannotti JP. Surgical options in the treatment of arthritis of the shoulder: alternatives to prosthetic arthroplasty. Semin Arthroplasty 1995; 6: 204–213.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ellman H, Harris E, Kay SP. Early degenerative joint dis-ease simulating impingement syndrome: arthroscopic findings. Arthroscopy 1992 8:482–487.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ide K, Shirai Y, Ito H. Sensory nerve supply in the human subacromial bursa. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 1996 5: 371–382.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    ShubinStein B, Wiater J, Pfaff C, Bigliani L, Levine W. Detection of acromioclavicular joint pathology in asymptomatic shoulders using magnetic resonance imaging. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2001; 10: 204–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bae H, Guyette T, Warren R, Craig E, Wickiewicz T. Results of subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial impingement and glenohumeral degenerative joint disease. Paper presented at: 67th Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2000; Orlando, FL.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Cameron B, Galatz L, Williams G, Ramsey M, Iannotti J. Nonprosthetic management of grade 4 osteoarthritis. Paper presented at: 67th meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2000; Orlando, FL.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory S. Bauer
  • Theodore A. Blaine
  • Louis U. Bigliani

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations