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Assessing Families: The Family Assessment of Family Competence, Strengths and Difficulties

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Abstract

The Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families (DoH, 2000a) (the Assessment Framework) emphasises the importance of systematic and comprehensive assessments of children and their families as a basis for effective planning and provision for children in need. Parenting capacity and family history and family functioning are seen to form major elements of the context in which a child’s developmental needs are responded to. It is therefore important to have an effective way of assessing family life and relationships and their contribution to meeting the needs of children.

Keywords

Family Functioning Family Therapy Sibling Relationship Family Identity Emotional Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Liza Bingley Miller and Arnon Bentovim 2003

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