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Lethal Neonatal LTBL Associated with Biallelic EARS2 Variants: Case Report and Review of the Reported Neuroradiological Features

  • Renata Oliveira
  • Ewen W. Sommerville
  • Kyle Thompson
  • Joana Nunes
  • Angela Pyle
  • Manuela Grazina
  • Patrick F. Chinnery
  • Luísa Diogo
  • Paula Garcia
  • Robert W. Taylor
Research Report
Part of the JIMD Reports book series (JIMD, volume 33)

Abstract

Mitochondrial translation defects are important causes of early onset mitochondrial disease. Although the biochemical (combined respiratory chain deficiency) signature and neuroimaging are usually distinctive, they are not diagnostic as the genetic origin of mitochondrial translation defects is heterogeneous. We report a female child, born at term to non-consanguineous parents, who exhibited global hypotonia, failure to thrive, persistent and progressive hyperlactacidaemia with lactic acidosis, liver dysfunction and encephalopathy and died at the age of 5 months. Brain MRI revealed hypogenesis of the corpus callosum, T2 signal abnormalities in the medulla oblongata, pons, midbrain, thalami, cerebellar white matter, and a lactate peak on MRS. Muscle histochemistry showed cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient and ragged-red fibres, while muscle biochemical studies showed decreased activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and IV. Whole exome sequencing (WES) identified biallelic EARS2 (NM_001083614) variants, a previously reported start-loss (c.1>G, p.Met1?) variant and a novel missense (c.184A>T, p.Ile62Phe) variant. Patient fibroblasts and muscle homogenate displayed markedly decreased EARS2 protein levels, although decreased steady-state levels of complex I (NDUFB8) and complex IV (MT-CO1 and MT-CO2) subunits were only observed in muscle. Pathogenic variants in EARS2, encoding mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (mtGluR), are associated with Leukoencephalopathy involving the Thalamus and Brainstem with high Lactate (LTBL), a mitochondrial disorder characterised by a distinctive brain MRI pattern and a biphasic clinical course. We further outline the unique phenotypic spectrum of LTBL and review the neuroradiological features reported in all patients documented in the literature.

Keywords

Early onset mitochondrial disease EARS2 LTBL Mitochondrial translation defects 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was partially financed by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) project PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013–2014. RWT and PFC are funded by the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research (096919/Z/11/Z) and the Medical Research Council (UK) Centre for Translational Muscle Disease (G0601943). RWT receives additional support from the Lily Foundation and the UK NHS Highly Specialised “Rare Mitochondrial Disorders of Adults and Children” Service in Newcastle upon Tyne. PFC is a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow in Clinical Science (101876/Z/13/Z), and a UK NIHR Senior Investigator, who receives additional support from the Medical Research Council Mitochondrial Biology Unit (MC_UP_1501/2), EU FP7 TIRCON, and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre based at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Cambridge. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Supplementary material

978-3-662-55012-0_581_MOESM1_ESM.docx (36 kb)
Table S1 Summary of the EARS2 patients with brain image published. COX – cytochrome c oxidase; DD – developmental delay; DN - dentate nucleus; FTT - failure to thrive; FU - follow up; GP - globus pallidus; MR - magnetic resonance; PVR - periventricular rim; RC – mitochondrial respiratory chain; RRF – ragged-red fibers; SDH – succinate dehydrogenase; WM - white matter; ‘+’ – present; ‘-’ – not present; ‘n.a.’ – not assessed; ‘n.d.’ – not determined (DOCX 36 kb)

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Copyright information

© SSIEM and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renata Oliveira
    • 1
  • Ewen W. Sommerville
    • 2
  • Kyle Thompson
    • 2
  • Joana Nunes
    • 3
  • Angela Pyle
    • 2
  • Manuela Grazina
    • 4
    • 5
  • Patrick F. Chinnery
    • 6
    • 7
  • Luísa Diogo
    • 8
  • Paula Garcia
    • 8
  • Robert W. Taylor
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Genetics DepartmentCentro Hospitalar de São JoãoPortoPortugal
  2. 2.Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Institute of NeuroscienceNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK
  3. 3.Imaging DepartmentCentro Hospitalar Vila Nova de Gaia/EspinhoVila Nova de GaiaPortugal
  4. 4.CNC – Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Laboratory of Biochemical GeneticsUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  5. 5.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  6. 6.Department of Clinical NeurosciencesSchool of Clinical Medicine, University of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  7. 7.MRC Mitochondrial Biology UnitCambridgeUK
  8. 8.Metabolic Unit – Child Development Center, Hospital PediátricoCentro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra (CHUC)CoimbraPortugal

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