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Diagnosis, Treatment, and Clinical Outcome of Patients with Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein/Long-Chain 3-Hydroxy Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

  • Irene De BiaseEmail author
  • Krista S. Viau
  • Aiping Liu
  • Tatiana Yuzyuk
  • Lorenzo D. Botto
  • Marzia Pasquali
  • Nicola Longo
Research Report
Part of the JIMD Reports book series (JIMD, volume 31)

Abstract

Deficiency of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) and long-chain 3-Hydroxy Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) impairs long-chain fatty acid oxidation and presents with hypoglycemia, cardiac, liver, eye, and muscle involvement. Without treatment, both conditions can be life-threatening. These diseases are identified by newborn screening (NBS), but the impact of early treatment on long-term clinical outcome is unknown. Moreover, there is lack of consensus on treatment, particularly on the use of carnitine supplementation. Here, we report clinical and biochemical data in five patients with TFP/LCHAD deficiency, three of whom were diagnosed by newborn screening. All patients had signs and symptoms related to their metabolic disorder, including hypoglycemia, elevated creatine kinase (CK), and rhabdomyolysis, and experienced episodes of metabolic decompensation triggered by illness. Treatment was started shortly after diagnosis in all patients and consisted of a diet low in long-chain fats supplemented with medium chain triglycerides (MCT), essential fatty acids, and low-dose carnitine (25 mg/kg/day). Patients had growth restriction early in life that resolved after 2 years of age. All patients but the youngest (2 years old) developed pigmentary retinopathy. Long-chain hydroxylated acylcarnitines did not change significantly with age, but increased during acute illnesses. Free carnitine levels were maintained within the normal range and did not correlate with long-chain hydroxylated acylcarnitines. These results show that patients with LCHAD deficiency can have normal growth and development with appropriate treatment. Low-dose carnitine supplements prevented carnitine deficiency and did not result in increased long-chain hydroxylated acylcarnitines or any specific toxicity.

Keywords

Acylcarnitine Carnitine Fatty acid oxidation Long-chain 3-Hydroxy Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency Newborn screening 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology®.

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Copyright information

© SSIEM and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene De Biase
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Krista S. Viau
    • 4
  • Aiping Liu
    • 3
  • Tatiana Yuzyuk
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lorenzo D. Botto
    • 4
  • Marzia Pasquali
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Nicola Longo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.ARUP LaboratoriesSalt Lake CityUSA
  3. 3.ARUP Institute of Clinical and Experimental PathologySalt Lake CityUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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