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Nutrition and Malnutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Italo Vantini
  • Fosca De Iorio
  • Naika Tacchella
  • Luigi Benini

Keywords

Bone Mineral Density Inflammatory Bowel Disease Enteral Nutrition Total Parenteral Nutrition Elemental Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Italo Vantini
    • 1
  • Fosca De Iorio
    • 1
  • Naika Tacchella
    • 1
  • Luigi Benini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical and Surgical Sciences Division of GastroenterologyPoliclinico “G.B. Rossi”VeronaItaly

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