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Bioconcentration, Bioaccumulation, and Biomagnification of Volatile Methylsiloxanes in Biota

  • Sofia AugustoEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 89)

Abstract

Volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS) are synthetic chemicals that have been extensively used in the manufacture of many industrial and consumer products and in the formulation of personal and health-care products. Due to their extensive use, VMS have been found in a diversity of abiotic media (air, soil, water, sediments) and in a wide range of aquatic and terrestrial organisms. The ubiquitous presence of VMS has raised concerns regarding whether these chemicals are prone to accumulate in aquatic and terrestrial life to levels higher than those found in the environment and ultimately to affect human and ecosystem health. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the studies that have been developed to understand if VMS have the potential to bioconcentrate, bioaccumulate, and biomagnify. Key factors affecting bioaccumulation of VMS by different organisms will be described, including physicochemical properties, environmental conditions, characteristics of the exposed organism, and the respective food chains. A review of the studies reporting VMS in different biota samples will be provided.

Keywords

Bioconcentration Biota-sediment accumulation Multimedia bioaccumulation Trophic magnification Volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author acknowledges the support from FCT-MCTES (SFRH/BPD/109382/2015) and the project 032084 from 02/SAICT/2017 (LANSILOT).

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.EPIUnitInstituto de Saúde Pública, Universidade do Porto (ISPUP/UP)PortoPortugal
  2. 2.Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes (cE3c), Faculdade de CiênciasUniversidade de LisboaLisboaPortugal

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