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Daytime Atmospheric Chemistry of C4C7 Saturated and Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds

  • Elena JiménezEmail author
  • Ian Barnes
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 32)

Abstract

This chapter aims to review the daytime atmospheric chemistry of some carbonyl compounds, crucial intermediates in the autocatalytic production of the main atmospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH•). Carbonyl compounds are very important trace gases for the physico-chemistry of the troposphere mainly because they are directly emitted into the atmosphere or formed in situ in the photooxidation of almost all organic compounds. Particularly aldehydes (RCHO, R=alkyl chain) and ketones (RC(O)R′) are important key species in many atmospheric processes, because they undergo a wide variety of reactions, both chemical and photolytic. This chapter presents a synthesis of the studies on the chemistry of C 4C 7 saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and ketones in the troposphere. A comprehensive revision of the gas-phase rate coefficients for the reactions of these carbonyls with the major diurnal oxidants, photolysis frequencies and chemical mechanisms is also presented. The impact of these species on urban air pollution is also discussed. These kinetic and photochemical data can be included in the chemical modules of atmospheric models which are used by policymakers in formulating and deciding strategies for the improvement of air quality.

Keywords

Aldehydes Atmospheric degradation Ketones Kinetics Photochemistry 

Abbreviations

CL

Chemiluminescence

DF

Discharge flow tube

FID

Flame ionisation detection

FP

Flash photolysis

FT

Flow tube

FTIR

Fourier transform infrared

GC

Gas chromatography

LIF

Laser-induced fluorescence

MCM

Master chemical mechanism

MIR

Maximum incremental reactivity

MS

Mass spectrometry

n.m.

Not measured

OVOC

Oxygenated volatile organic compound

PAN

Peroxyacetyl nitrate

PANs

Peroxyacyl nitrates

PLP

Pulsed laser photolysis

POCP

Photochemical ozone creation potential

ppmv

Parts per million based on volume

RF

Resonance fluorescence

ROG

Reactive organic gas

RR

Relative rate

SAR

Structure activity relationship

SOA

Secondary organic aerosol

UV

Ultraviolet

VOC

Volatile organic compound

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologías QuímicasUniversidad de Castilla-La ManchaCiudad RealSpain
  2. 2.Instituto de Investigación en Combustión y Contaminación Atmosférica (ICCA)Universidad de Castilla-La ManchaCiudad RealSpain
  3. 3.Fachbereich C – Physikalische ChemieBergische Universität WuppertalWuppertalGermany

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