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Risk Management of Chemicals in the Leather Sector: A Case Study from Sweden

  • Stefan RydinEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 18)

Abstract

The leather industry is a traditional industrial sector. The industry uses both a high variety and high amount of chemicals during the production of leather from raw hides and skins. The chemicals used will end up in the product, in the environment (wastewater, solid waste, air) and in by-products. This chapter describes how a modern tannery in Sweden is working with the risk management of chemicals in order to reduce the health and safety risks at the company and also to reduce the environmental impact of the company and avoiding hazardous chemicals in the product. The tannery is using 350 different chemicals in the different processes and in general the tannery adds 3 kg of chemicals for every kilogram of leather that is produced. The tannery has implemented environmental management systems and has a very good control of all processes in the tannery. The chapter focuses on how the tannery assesses new chemicals before they are introduced, how the tannery substitutes potential dangerous chemicals by less dangerous alternatives, how the tannery reduces the impact of chemicals to the environment by the use of best available techniques complemented by treatment facilities such as a newly built wastewater treatment plant and finally how the company monitors the content of certain chemicals in the finished leather.

Keywords

Additives BAT Case study Chemicals Eco-label GADSL Leather REACH Substitution Wastewater treatment Water 

Abbreviations

BAT

Best available techniques

BBP

Butylbenzylphtalate

BDE

Bromodiphenyl ether

BREF

BAT reference document

CAS

Chemical abstracts service

CLP

Classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures

DBP

Dibutylphtalate

DBT

Dibutyl tin

DEHP

Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phtalate

DIBP

Di-iso-butylphtalate

ECHA

European Chemicals Agency

EINECS

European inventory of existing chemical substances

EU

European Union

GADSL

Global automotive declarable substance list

GASG

Global automotive stakeholders group

GHS

Globally harmonized system of classification and labelling of chemicals

HBCDD

Hexabromocyclododecane

NP

Nonylphenol

NPE

Nonylphenol ethoxylate

LGR

Lederinstitut Gerberschule Reutlingen

PAH

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

PBB

Polybrominated biphenyls

PCP

Pentachlorophenol

PFOS

Perfluorooctane sulphonate

REACH

Registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals

SCCP

Short chained chlorinated paraffins

SVHC

Substance of very high concern

TBT

Tributyl tin

TCEP

Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate

TCMTB

2-(Thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole

TeCP

Tetrachlorophenol

TEPA

Tris-/aziridinyl)-phosphinoxide

TPhT

Triphenyltin

TRIS

Tri-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-phosphate

VOC

Volatile organic compound

References

  1. 1.
    European Commission (2006) Regulation No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    PRIO – A tool for risk reduction of chemicals. Swedish Chemical Agency Web. Available at: http://www.kemi.se. Accessed 25 February 2011
  3. 3.
    European Commission (2008) Directive 2008/105/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 December 2008 on environmental quality standards in the field of water policyGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Global Automotive Declarable Substance List website. Available at: http://www.gadsl.org. Accessed 25 February 2011
  5. 5.
    European Commission (2010) Directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 on industrial emissions (integrated pollution prevention and control)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    European commission (2009) Regulation no 552/2009 of 22 June 2009 amending Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) as regards Annex XVIIGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    European Commission (1998) Directive 98/7/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 1998 concerning the placing of biocidal products on the market (Biocidal Products Directive)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Rydin S (2006) Environment in focus at Elmo Leather. Leather International August/September 2006Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Rydin S, Svensson L (2006) Innovative waste water treatment plant at Elmo Leather AB. In: Proceedings of the IULTCS II. Eurocongress Istanbul, TurkeyGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Oeko-Tex 100 Eco-label website. Available at: http://www.oeko-Tex100_PUBLIC/index.asp?cls=21. Accessed 25 February 2011

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nordeconsult Sweden ABLundSweden

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