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Whole Blood Assay as a Tool to Describe the Effects of Zinc Oxide Exposure on Innate Immunity

  • Verena LiebersEmail author
  • Benjamin Kendzia
  • Christian Monsé
  • Birger Jettkant
  • Heike Stubel
  • Gerda Borowitzki
  • Olaf Hagemeyer
  • Thomas Brüning
  • Rolf Merget
  • Monika Raulf
Chapter
  • 44 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1271)

Abstract

Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles may cause metal fume fever. A useful tool to characterize the reactivity of innate immune cells of an individual, e.g., after in vivo exposure, is the whole blood assay (WBA). The measurable outcome of WBA is the release of cytokines, especially pro-inflammatory and pyrogenic cytokines induced by stimulation in vitro. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether inhalation of nano-sized zinc oxide particles modifies the results of WBA from healthy blood donors. Sixteen healthy subjects were exposed to filtered air and ZnO particles (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/m3) for 4 h on four different days. Blood was collected before and 24 h after exposure, and ex vivo stimulation of the whole blood was performed using different endotoxin concentrations. The release of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 after 22-h incubation was quantified with specific immunoassays. The dose-response relationship of ex vivo stimulation with different endotoxin concentrations was not affected by previous ZnO exposure. However, based on the previously established calculation models, changes due to ZnO exposure could be described. The range of cytokine release in WBA was calculated for the whole group of blood donors, for the subgroups of low and high responders (each n = 8), and on the individual level. Most changes were observed after 0.5 mg/m3 ZnO exposure. Higher ZnO exposure did not yield higher effects. We conclude that the effects of inhalation of nano-sized ZnO particles in blood of healthy donors using the WBA could be determined. However, it should be noted that cytokine release as outcome of WBA is not a marker of disease.

Keywords

Cytokine release Endotoxin Immunity Interleukins Nano-sized particles Whole blood assay Zinc oxide 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors want to express their gratitude to all participants of the study. The study was financed by the German Social Accident Insurance (part of the projects IPA-108 and IPA-48).

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in relation to this article.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (No. 4929–14).

Informed Consent

Written informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Verena Liebers
    • 1
    Email author
  • Benjamin Kendzia
    • 1
  • Christian Monsé
    • 1
  • Birger Jettkant
    • 1
  • Heike Stubel
    • 1
  • Gerda Borowitzki
    • 1
  • Olaf Hagemeyer
    • 1
  • Thomas Brüning
    • 1
  • Rolf Merget
    • 1
  • Monika Raulf
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident InsuranceInstitute of the Ruhr University Bochum (IPA)BochumGermany

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