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Effects of Exposure to Carbon Dioxide in Potash Miners

  • Christian MonséEmail author
  • Birger Jettkant
  • Bernd Karl Heinrich Schramm
  • Horst Christoph Broding
  • Matthias Knappe
  • Manfred Michl
  • Frank Hoffmeyer
  • Kirsten Sucker
  • Thomas Brüning
  • Jürgen Bünger
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1150)

Abstract

Potash miners can become exposed to carbon dioxide (CO2) during the blasting of basalt intrusions or loading and transporting the blasted salt. In a cross-shift study, we compared physiological effects of acute exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations in miners after long-term exposure to evaluate the possible health risks. A group of 119 miners was assessed by clinical examination, lung function tests, and blood gas content directly before and after the shift. A cumulative CO2 exposure was measured using personal monitors. The miners were categorized as low (<0.1 vol.%, n = 83), medium (<0.5 vol.%, n = 26), and high (>0.5 vol.%, n = 10) CO2 exposed subjects. We found no significant differences among the three groups. Lung function testing revealed no conspicuous findings, and chronic health effects were not observed in the miners either. In conclusion, no significant adverse effects could be found in potash miners exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations. Therefore, the mining authorities allow potash mining operations for 4 h at ambient CO2 up to 1.0 vol.% and for 2 h at CO2 not exceeding 1.5 vol.% per shift.

Keywords

Air monitoring Blood pH Carbon dioxide Lung function pCO2 Potash miners 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to our volunteers for their participation. The authors thank Hans Berresheim, Anja Deckert, Sven Koszma, Thomas Lüttke, Anja Molkenthin, Roswitha Nioduschewski, Nina Rosenkranz, Jan Schramm and Patrick Schulze for their excellent technical assistance.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in relation to this article.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG  2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Monsé
    • 1
    Email author
  • Birger Jettkant
    • 1
  • Bernd Karl Heinrich Schramm
    • 2
  • Horst Christoph Broding
    • 3
  • Matthias Knappe
    • 4
  • Manfred Michl
    • 4
  • Frank Hoffmeyer
    • 1
  • Kirsten Sucker
    • 1
  • Thomas Brüning
    • 1
  • Jürgen Bünger
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident InsuranceInstitute of the Ruhr-University Bochum (IPA)BochumGermany
  2. 2.Klinik fur Herzchirurgie, Klinikzentrum Mitte, Klinikum Dortmund GmbHDortmundGermany
  3. 3.Department of Occupational Medicine and Corporate Health Management, Faculty of Health and School of MedicineWitten/Herdecke UniversityWittenGermany
  4. 4.K+S AktiengesellschaftKasselGermany

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