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Advances in Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Public Health: Refractory Trichophyton rubrum Infections in Turin, Italy: A Problem Still Present

  • Vivian Tullio
  • Ornella Cervetti
  • Janira Roana
  • Michele Panzone
  • Daniela Scalas
  • Chiara Merlino
  • Valeria Allizond
  • Giuliana Banche
  • Narcisa Mandras
  • Anna Maria CuffiniEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 901)

Abstract

Dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton rubrum is the most common cutaneous fungal infection in industrialized countries and worldwide with high recurrence and lack of treatment response. In addition, patients with cutaneous and concurrent toenail lesions are often misdiagnosed and therefore treated with an inappropriate therapy. In this study, we evaluated five previously misdiagnosed cases of T.rubrum chronic dermatophytosis sustained by two variants at sites distant from the primary lesion. Our patients were successfully treated by systemic and topical therapy, and 1 year after the end of therapy follow-up did not show any recurrence of infection.

Our data indicate that the localization of all lesions, the isolation and the identification of the causative fungus are essential to establish the diagnosis and the setting of a correct therapeutic treatment to avoid recurrences.

Keywords

Trichophyton rubrum Chronic dermatophytosis Misdiagnosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivian Tullio
    • 1
  • Ornella Cervetti
    • 2
  • Janira Roana
    • 1
  • Michele Panzone
    • 3
  • Daniela Scalas
    • 1
  • Chiara Merlino
    • 1
  • Valeria Allizond
    • 1
  • Giuliana Banche
    • 1
  • Narcisa Mandras
    • 1
  • Anna Maria Cuffini
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Bacteriology and Mycology Laboratory, Department of Public Health and PediatricsUniversity of TorinoTurinItaly
  2. 2.Department of Medical SciencesUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  3. 3.A.O.U. Città della Salute e della ScienzaSan Lazzaro HospitalTurinItaly

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