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Directed Rhodium-Catalyzed Hydroformylation of Alkenes

  • Bernhard BreitEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Organometallic Chemistry book series (TOPORGAN, volume 24)

Abstract

Installation of substrate-bound catalyst-directing phosphine groups allows for efficient substrate control of all aspects of reaction selectivity in the course of the industrially important hydroformylation reaction. In particular, the ortho-diphenylphosphanylbenzoyl (o-DPPB) group has proved to be a highly efficient and practical directing group for controlling regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity of a range allylic and homoallylic alcohol derivatives. A chiral variant, the o-DPPF directing group, enables a desymmetrizing hydroformylation of prochiral dialkenyl- and diallylcarbinols to give substrates with two stereocenters in enantiomerically pure form. Incorporation of the hydroformylation as part of sequential processes is possible and has led to the development of synthetically appealing multiple carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond formations.

Desymmetrization Hydroformylation Sequential transformations Substrate-directable reactions Rhodium 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institut für Organische Chemie und BiochemieAlbert-Ludwigs-Universität FreiburgFreiburg im BreisgauGermany

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