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‘Do It Yourself’ Student Models for Collaborative Student Modelling and Peer Interaction

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1452)

Abstract

An approach to student modelling is presented where learners build their own student models. A more accurate model may thereby be obtained, and learners may reflect on their beliefs while constructing their model. The diyM system is illustrated in four environments: two collaborative student modelling systems, and two learner modelling systems with peer interaction as their focus.

Keywords

Main Clause Student Model Learner Reflection Peer Assessment Menu Option 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of LanguagesUniversity of BrightonFalmer, East SussexUK

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