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Automating the multimedia content production lifecycle

  • P. Foster
  • S. Banthorpe
  • R. Gepp
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1425)

Abstract

With the increasing number of new media services comes the consumer's enormous appetite for fresh content to populate them. Whether considering high profile advanced interactive digital TV services or simple World Wide Web sites, the cost of producing and maintaining accurate, up-to-date and stimulating material must be minimised to make these newly found market channels viable. This paper theorises ways of supporting automated content production and delivery which can span organisational boundaries, using a combination of contractual metadata templates and workflow management. The objective is to enable the service owner to significantly reduce the number of manual processes which constitute the largest part of the end-to-end content management overhead.

Keywords

Content Management Multimedia Service Content Provider Content Production Common Object Request Broker Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Foster
    • 1
  • S. Banthorpe
    • 1
  • R. Gepp
    • 1
  1. 1.BT LaboratoriesMartlesham HeathIpswichUK

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