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Medical image analysis and simulation

  • Nicholas Ayache
Invited Lecturers
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1345)

Abstract

This article introduces the research field of digital image analysis and simulation applied to medicine.

Although the number of medical images produced in the world increases each year, their quantitative exploitation for diagnosis and therapy remains quite suboptimal.

This article reviews the potentialities offered by the research in digital image analysis and simulation, and presents a short survey of the state of the art.

Keywords

Computer Vision Medical Image Virtual Reality Digital Image Analysis Deformable Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Ayache
    • 1
  1. 1.INRIA - EPIDAURE ProjectSophia-AntipolisFrance

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